Cherokee Central School

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          The Cherokee Central School Board will meet in regular session on Monday, July 10, 2017 at 4:45 in the CCS Board Conference Room.
About Us » Cultural Fact Sheet

Cultural Fact Sheet

Cultural Fact Sheet

General Information
 
  • The project site is culturally significant in that it has been proven by archaeological study to have had continuous Cherokee habitation for over 500 years
  • The site reconnects the community of Big Cove to the rest of the Qualla Boundary
  • Clay paints are used on accent walls to mimic traditional paints
  • Overall color palettes are from natural colors of white oak splints, split river can, and honeysuckle as well as natural dyes used in basketry (bloodroot, yellowroot, black walnut)
  • Areas for traditional sports such as stickball, chunkey, blowgun, and archery ranges are provided
  • 96,000 board feet of lumber was salvaged from the site and reused within the buildings as trim, furniture, decorative wall wainscot, and 7-sided ceiling trellises
 
Building Design Features
 
  • Patterns in the cement stucco on the building exteriors recreate traditional basket weave patterns
  • The stucco represents the wattle and daub method of construction used by the early mountain Indians
  • Color palettes for the stucco are from the pure raw clay colors as they appear when excavated from the ground.
  • Basket weave patterns include: Unbroken Friendship, Man on Horse, Noon Day Sun, Broken Heart, Peace Pipes, Chief's Heart, & Fish Bone
  • The fishbone pattern is repeated in the millions of the glass curtain wall of the buildings many connectors.
  • Traditional basket weave patterns are repeated on the interior of the buildings in casework laminates, wall coverings, carpet tile arrangement, and metal handrails
  • Student art will be able to be incorporated within the schools. A depiction of the creation story's water beetle was created by two local art students in a stained etching on the floor.
 
Landscape Design
 
  • All plant species used are 100% native and /or culturally significant to the Cherokee, including edible and medicinal plants
  • A reforestation area is provided with groves of the seven trees considered scared by the tribe
  • Interpretive signs will list the Cherokee name and traditional uses for different plants
  • Specialty gardens and plant propagation projects such as river can, white oak, basket dye plants, and ramps are featured throughout the landscape and will provide renewable and sustainable resources for students
  • A community garden area will feature raised organic beds and a solar powered water supply
  • Outdoor classroom areas will include basket weave paving patterns and rustic wood furniture
 
Building Design
 
  • Because the project is so large, individual buildings are created to mimic the "Village" concept
  • In traditional Cherokee towns, buildings were typically grouped around the council house
  • The schools are arranged around two seven-sided courtyards, each approximately an acre in size
  • To respect tradition, most students enter the buildings from the east
  • A 350-seat, seven-sided gathering place is provided for cultural events